Tag Archive: invasive species

Burmese Python Hatchlings Found in Florida Keys – snake owners must be careful

Last month three Burmese Python hatchlings were found in Key Largo.  This is concerning.  Burmese Pythons are large snakes – up to 18 ft. – and can eat a wide variety of vertebrate animals – including alligators.  They can certainly cause a problem for local wildlife and pets.  State and federal agencies have had traps placed …

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Permanent link to this article: http://escambia.ifas.ufl.edu/blog/2016/09/26/burmese-python-hatchlings-found-in-florida-keys-snake-owners-must-be-careful/

An Early Study Shows the Invasion of the Asian Tiger Shrimp Could Have an Impact on Native Shrimp

The Asian Tiger Shrimp (Penaeus monodon) have been reported across the northern Gulf of Mexico for several years now but unlike Cogon grass, Chinese tallow, and Lionfish they have not really made the press.  We know they are there, but captures in shrimp trawls seem to be infrequent… it just does not look like a …

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Permanent link to this article: http://escambia.ifas.ufl.edu/blog/2016/09/02/an-early-study-shows-the-invasion-of-the-asian-tiger-shrimp-could-have-an-impact-on-native-shrimp/

10,000 Lionfish Have Been Submitted in the FWC Lionfish Challenge

The state is doing their best to try to remove lionfish.  After the success Lionfish Removal and Awareness Day held across the state – and in Pensacola – the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission initiated a Lionfish Challenge.  In this program divers submit lionfish tails to local dive shops.  The number of tails submitted …

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Permanent link to this article: http://escambia.ifas.ufl.edu/blog/2016/08/12/10000-lionfish-have-been-submitted-in-the-fwc-lionfish-challenge/

1st Annual Statewide Nonnative Fish Catch, Click, and Submit Contest

The Everglades Cooperative Invasive Species Management Area (ECISMA) is organizing a nonnative freshwater fishing tournament for Invasive Species Week. Begins:             6:00 AM Saturday February 21, 2015 Ends:               12:00 AM Sunday March 1, 2015   OBJECTIVES FOR TOURNAMENT Document the distribution of freshwater nonnative fish in Florida Increase awareness of the problem with nonnative freshwater fish …

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Permanent link to this article: http://escambia.ifas.ufl.edu/blog/2015/02/20/3484/

Inshore Lionfish Final Report for 2014 – September 5

The original plan for the inshore lionfish survey was to do weekly dives during July and August. After a dive on August 31 the team did not see a lionfish at any of the inshore reefs or structures. We did have 2 unverified reports of lionfish from residents. One was mid summer at Ft. McRee …

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Permanent link to this article: http://escambia.ifas.ufl.edu/blog/2014/09/05/inshore-lionfish-final-report-for-2014-september-5/

Another New Invader is in Town – Beach Vitex

Beach vitex (Vitex rotundifolia) is a plant native to the western shores of the Pacific Ocean. It was first brought to the United States in the 1980’s to help stabilize and restore dunes in the Carolina’s after a heavy hurricane season. The plant quickly began to take over and crowd out natives within their dune …

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Permanent link to this article: http://escambia.ifas.ufl.edu/blog/2014/04/18/another-new-invader-is-in-town-beach-vitex/

Update – Escambia Lionfish Round Up

WEEK 6 – 58 lionfish have been logged No.’s by Charters – NIUHI (41 fish), Y-Knot (10 fish), Lavoie Spearfishing (5 fish), S. Walker (2) We are now in the 51st day of this 61 day event. Only 56 lionfish have been submitted at this point but conversation with local dive shops suggest that the …

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Permanent link to this article: http://escambia.ifas.ufl.edu/blog/2013/08/23/update-escambia-lionfish-round-up/

Beach Vitex… Is It A Growing Problem?

It’s actually a pretty plant, this beach vitex (Vitex rotundifolia), and it is very good at stabilizing eroding dunes; but folks along the Atlantic coast had no idea how invasive it would become.  In the 1990’s the state of South Carolina planted this shrub to help restore dunes lost during hurricanes.  It is salt tolerant, …

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Permanent link to this article: http://escambia.ifas.ufl.edu/blog/2013/07/08/beach-vitex-is-it-a-growing-problem/