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Snake Watch – June 16, 2014

SNAKE SEEKING NEAR CANTONMENT FLORIDA

 

We are quickly approaching the warmer months of summer and the high temperatures that come with it.  In the higher temperatures snakes will seek shelter; venturing out more often during the cooler mornings and evenings and during rain events.  This week I searched the Langley Bell 4-H Camp and Roy Hyatt Environmental Center.  Both days I searched the air temperatures climbed very quickly and I did not see any snakes.  I did find a snake skin in an old greenhouse at Roy Hyatt but the live animals were somewhere cool.  I was shown a photograph of a 5 foot Eastern Diamondback found at the Langley Bell Camp in 1996.  The caretaker there said he has seen about 5 over the last few years.  This camp was recently sold to a credit union and the gentlemen clearing land for the new buildings were wearing snake boots – suggesting they are finding some.

 

The gray rat snake is an excellent climber; as this one at the Roy Hyatt Environmental Center shows.  Photo: Molly O'Connor

The gray rat snake is an excellent climber; as this one at the Roy Hyatt Environmental Center shows. Photo: Molly O’Connor

I plan to search weekly through the end of June and then focus on lionfish for a couple of months.  I encourage you to continue to report snake sightings in the panhandle to my email during the summer months (roc1@ufl.edu). If you have any questions or seek more information on particular snakes, just let me know.  Here is a quick update on the information logged from the beginning of May until this weekend.

 

33 snakes logged – counties include: Escambia, Santa Rosa, Okaloosa, Walton, and Leon.

Eastern Diamondback Rattlesnakes – 3 (2 from Escambia; 1 from Walton)

Florida Pine Snake – 1 (Santa Rosa)

Southern Hognose Snake – 0

 

I also encourage those who find one of the three snakes listed above to report them to FWC at: http://myfwc.com/conservation/you-conserve/wildlife/snakes

Permanent link to this article: https://escambia.ifas.ufl.edu/blog/2014/06/16/snake-watch-june-16-2014/